Welcome

Mistakes Writers Make is a blog and website for aspiring, new and more experienced writers of articles, features, essays and other forms of non-fiction.

The blog focuses mainly on writing mistakes commonly made by new writers — and gives advice on how to put them right.

Elsewhere on the site there are market opportunities, plus magazine launches, non-fiction writing competitions, publishing news, useful links and much more.

The site is edited by me, Alex Gazzola — a writer with twenty years’ experience in the business, and over ten as a writing tutor.

 

Latest Articles and Posts …

 

Freelance Writing Rates

The eternal question. How much do magazines and newspapers pay? It varies, of course, and it’s not always easy to get a straightforward answer, but here is some information and some resources that can tell you what you need to know.

 

 

Should you ever assign copyright? 

I would always urge against assigning all rights in your work for a one-off fee, and certainly against giving it away entirely. But are there ever any exceptions to that rule?

 

 

Forgetting your Memories (Mistake #123)

Penning your memoir can help you make sense of your character and your life and come to terms with difficult past events. And it could give you lots of material for articles too …

 

 

Starting Your Career as a Freelance Writing

New review of a new book — by Moira Allen, who has updated her excellent, thorough book on how to make a living with the words you write.

 

 

Stop telling writers they should be writing!

Why do so many figures and bodies in the writing world see fit to tell writers they should always be writing? Enough! Writers are not wholly defined and confined by their job title.

 

 

From the Heart of a Copy Editor

An affordable new book on copy editing and proofreading your own work has been released by Sheila Glasbey. Here is my short review of it.

 

 

Are W and Y Vowels?

Of course they are. But what’s a boy to do when nobody really agrees with him? Run a poll and have a moan when it goes wrong, apparently …

 

 

Unwritten Letters (Mistake #121)

Do you write letters to editors’ letters pages? If not — you should. Not only might there a prize — perhaps a cash one — but it’s an accessible route to publication, and always satisfying to see your name in print.

 

 

Em dash, en dash, hyphen — which to use?

Most writers instinctively know when to use a hyphen correctly, but what about the longer en dash or the even longer em dash? Are you using them when needed? Here’s a quick guide.

 

 

Worrying about the expert (Mistake #120)

For every subject you write about, there’s an expert out there potentially tut-tutting and shaking their head at your treatment of their subject. Here’s why you shouldn’t care less …

 

 

Stopping when stuck (Mistake #119)

Summoning up the help of Fleetwood Mac and Jeanette Winterson, here’s some advice on what to do if you find yourself stuck while working on any writing project – be it small or larger.

 

 

Writing Your Non-Fiction Book

A new ebook, just shy of 8,000 words, on how to conceive, pitch, sell, write and market your non-fiction book. Wish I could offer it for free but Amazon are insisting I charge just under a quid or just over a buck! 🙂

 

 

Brexit Part II (Mistake #118)

Another look at writing about Brexit – for the next two years, and quite possibly well beyond, there’ll be a lot to write about, from all sorts of angles, for all sorts of markets. Can you get a piece of the Union-exiting pie?

 

New ebook: 50 More Mistakes Beginner Writers Make

A shameless self-publicising post: book II in our Mistakes Writers Make series of ebooks, the follow up to 50 Mistakes Beginner Writers Make, is now out, priced at only £1.99.

 

 

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close